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Here's how: See the Activity Calendar You can sign up for a date to bing a simple dinner for Doug and Betsy or to stop by for a quick chat to catch up. Thanks in advance for your help and your fellowship!

Ripping the Guts out of Recovery

The U.S. has a temporary reprieve on the debt ceiling limit – tax revenues have come in higher than expected in the early part of the year, reducing the needed pace of borrowing by the U.S. government. While this has pushed the deadline for Congressional action back by a month or more, the rhetoric in [...]

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Keynes vs. Hayek

Freidrich Hayek and the Austrian school of economic policy argue for a laissez faire approach to the economy – emphasizing individual actions and criticizing government intervention. John Maynard Keynes acknowledged that economies could, over time, correct themselves, but argued that government had a responsibility to intervene and stimulate demand when the economy is in a [...]

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Gold Bugs

The price of gold has gone over $1,400 an ounce recently. In addition to the raft of stories and questions about investing in gold, I get questions about whether we should return to the gold standard. Blogger confession – I’m going to use the opportunity to organize my own thoughts on the issue.
The quick answer [...]

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Keynes vs. Hayek

This rap video comes with a hat tip to Prof. Brad DeLong at Berkeley. It’s something of an inside joke to economists, but it reveals a fundamental tension between those who say we should use our understanding of economic forces to intervene for the sake of the country and the globe and those who place [...]

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Selling the Stimulus

James Surowiecki writes in The New Yorker that a combination of thoughtful, but less visible stimulus decisions and some less effective decisions made it hard for the American people to believe the 2009 fiscal stimulus worked.
[The] Washington stimulus has become the policy that dare not speak its name. This wouldn’t be surprising if we [...]

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The Great Recession?

Catharine Rampell in The New York Times Economix blog wonders if the most recent recession has earned the title, The Great Recession. She is leaning towards, “yes”.
Here is one graph that illustrates the impact on economic output from 10 post World War II recessions. No contest.

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Not Just China

In my summer Principles of Macroeconomics class we’ve been discussing the reasons why China has surged to be such a strong economic power.
In an article in The New York Times, Turkey is described as another surprising country showing remarkable growth.
Today, Turkey is a fast-rising economic power, with a core of internationally competitive companies [...]

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Are We Better/Worse Off than Greece and the Euro Community?

Jasen Hartford, a friend and past student, recently asked me,
As we all know, the European Union has recently been under the lime light with their budget deficit problem – causing a lot of anxiety for investors in the U.S. I’m curious if there’s a reason why the even greater deficit in [...]

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Pay to Send Email?

N. Gregory Mankiw posted a semi-tongue-in-cheek note on his blog suggesting that we consider a system where email senders pay to send a message. One of Mankiw’s readers opined…
I think an excellent Pigouvian tax would be a tax on emails. Many emails involve a negative externality (I don’t really want to receive [...]

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Early Laffer Curve Application

Arthur Laffer is credited with the eponymous theory that a decrease in tax rates can lead to an increase in tax revenues. Even if the original theory may have been scribbled on a napkin, it still holds sway with the supply side contingent. The simplified explanation is that by reducing tax rates, income earning individuals [...]

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